Tag: Justice

One Thing I Do Know

muddyhandsJohn 9:1-41
Ephesians 5:8-14

Why do bad things happen? It’s something we ask, again and again. And the people of the Bible ask it again and again. And just like we come to different conclusions, so, too, do our mothers and fathers in the faith. The most common conclusion back then, and today, is that a person gets what they deserve. This makes us feel good, and speaks to our sense of right and wrong and justice. Bad people get punished. Good people get rewarded.

It goes like this: why is a man in jail? Because he has bad morals and is guilty of a crime. Why is a woman poor? Because she spends too much money and doesn’t work hard enough. How do you be successful? By following the rules.

This is an easy answer to why bad things happen, and it is usually the first answer we concluded. So-and-so had something bad happen because they caused it to happen to themselves. The Bible goes further and some authors conclude that even things like blindness, sickness, and death are caused by moral failings – caused by a person sinning. Some interpretations of Genesis? Adam and Eve ‘earn’ death because of their sin. Plenty die in the Bible because they ‘ired’ God. Today, AIDS is often called the ‘gay disease’ and called a punishment for homosexuality. People with opiate or painkiller addictions are often accused of being thieves, druggies, addicts – others say their whole identity is their addiction.

This reasoning gets tricky when we see bad things happen to good people; or good things happening to immoral people. This threatens our notion of right and wrong, of justice. See, Job was righteous – yet terrible things happen to him. Jesus is literally SINLESS and yet horrific things occur to him. We know people who would give the shirt off their backs to help another, and yet they can’t seem to catch a break. And we know of cases, like my own daughter, where a child dies before they even take a breath. Who, then, is to blame? Surely you can’t say the baby sinned. Surely you can’t say Jesus sinned.

Over the centuries, some came up with the idea of Original Sin – the idea we are all born sinful. So even brand new babies carry sin – and that is why bad things still happen. In our scripture today, some of Jesus’ disciples assert the stance that parents’ sins are passed on to their innocent children. These aren’t outdated conclusions. Both Original Sin and parents’ sins are active conclusions nowadays on why bad things happen.

It’s why so many want their children baptized super young – to wash away that Original Sin.

It’s why we always ask, “Was her mommy a druggie?” or “What did the parents do wrong?” when we hear of young babies dying, or miscarriages, or stillbirths. Someone, somewhere, sinned. Someone, somewhere, is to blame.

If we don’t have someone to blame, our sense of right and wrong, our sense of justice, is thrown out the window. We don’t like to see innocents suffering, but it makes more sense to us if we can reason their suffering is because of their parents, or grandparents, or Adam and Eve… or any sin somewhere. It lets us still say that what people get, they deserve.

Today – Jesus’ disciples ask: did this born blind man sin, or did his parents? Who do we blame for him being blind?

Jesus replies: neither. The blame doesn’t lie on the man nor his family.

Why is he blind, then? The NRSV adds the words to the scripture, “he was born blind.” The original reads, “So that God’s works might be revealed in him, we must work the works of He who sent me.” Our translation into English with its added words say the man was born blind SO THAT Jesus could show God’s work. Our translation adds in blame, and places the blame on God.

The Greek original doesn’t do this. Jesus doesn’t add blame. Doesn’t say blame the man, nor his parents, nor God. Jesus skips the blame and says if we want to see God, we must help this guy. No judgment. No placing morality on the blindness. Just saying – bad crud happens. Help each other out, and you will see God in the helping.

So Jesus does as he preaches.

And you see the result – the blind man comes to testify Christ while the whole town goes about finding someone to blame. Someone must be to blame for the blindness! Some blame Jesus – who worked on the Sabbath. Some blame the man, for secretly harboring sin. They call in his parents to try to blame them for doing something that caused their son to be born blind. In the end – they toss the man out of the town. That is easier than admitting…

… sometimes… terrible things happen… and no one is to blame.

God’s will? Maybe. Primordial chaos left over from God placing order and making creation? Maybe. Result of Original Sin, or just sins? Maybe. Just meaningless? Maybe.

Jesus doesn’t offer the answer. He says don’t worry about placing the blame, instead, do something to help the situation. Don’t fret about if the person who is addicted has an ‘addictive personality.’ Be their friend and support now. Don’t fret about if parents didn’t eat right while the baby was in utero – comfort them now. Don’t fret about if a beggar has a job, or is getting food stamps, or deserves a hand out, or what they’re going to use that cash for… just help them out, now.

Jesus isn’t amoral. He isn’t advocating let everyone do as they please and let there be no consequences. He isn’t saying sin isn’t real. Jesus picks up John’s message telling us to repent and turn to God. However – Jesus is way more concerned that we live our lives helping one another than blaming one another.

Look at how much of this chapter is people blaming each other rather than helping the blind man and his family!

Look at their final action – tossing the formerly blind man out of the town – rather than rejoicing he now has sight!

Jesus isn’t answering our theodicy questions; he isn’t telling us why bad things happen. Instead, he’s giving us a way to respond to the bad we see — respond with love. Not judgment.

As the formerly blind man said, “I do not know whether he is a sinner. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.” No need to decide is someone is a sinner. Just be able to see them—help them, know them, love them.

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None Too Small

ieshia-evans-batonrougeJeremiah 1:4-10
Luke 13:10-17

Crises are terrible, horrible situations – a time when things are a disaster, catastrophe, and calamity.

But did you know they’re also the turning point? Whatever happens in the future from that moment, for better or worse, is influenced by the critical time of the crisis.

City after city, we keep seeing a crisis appear where a cop shoots an African American dead. And city after city, riots and protests appear. City after city — after months of looking into it — the cops are never charged, and if charged, almost always found innocent. Last year, 102 unarmed black people were shot and killed by police — five times as many unarmed whites killed. Unarmed. No weapon. Another 200 some blacks were killed by police who did have weapons… now mind you, this pocket knife (1.5 inches) I have here is counted as a weapon. Whether these men, women, and even children, had pocket knives or automatic rifles isn’t counted. Of all these lives lost, a single offer was sentenced to jail on the weekends. All other officers walked free. (mappingpoliceviolence.org/unarmed)

Who has been shot? You’ve heard about 12 year old Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, Alton Sterling, and Philando Castile who was asked to hand over his wallet and was shot dead for doing so — before his girlfriend and 4 year old daughter.

But… hundreds of other names never made national media. Did you hear about Bettie? She opened her door to the officers when they arrived and they shot her in the neck.

Or Keith. He had an unknown item which scared the officer watching him and so the officer shot Keith. It was a cell phone in his hand.

There was Chandra – hit by a patrol car. And Stephen – another patrol car hit him, too – as it responded to a non-emergency call.

And India – officers chose to shoot 30 rounds into her stopped car because they believed India’s boyfriend had a gun. Their shots killed India, her boyfriend, and only through a pure miracle missed their 4 month old baby sitting in a car seat with them.

There is a crisis. A crisis going on – with some cities’ police and justice departments abusing their power, racially profiling, and overwhelmingly murdering blacks. Non-whites in general are often targeted with harsher responses. Sometimes, this is the accepted way not just the police, but the entire city deals with its non-whites. Violence. Suspicion. Hate.

Don’t think I’m talking about the Deep South. I’m talking about right around here. Here in Fairfield County. We have people flying confederate flags, we have a very high Ku Klux Klan presence.

Ever heard of ISD Records? They’re based out of Lancaster, and listed as one of the 34 most dangerous hate groups of Ohio. (Southern Poverty Law Center). Their CDs include “No Remorse: Hitler was Right.” and “The Klansmen – Fetch the Rope” Our Lancaster. Supported by our community.

There is a crisis. And few white people — few of the people in power, few of those with the ability to change things or bring attention to the crisis — are noticing.

And so… there are protests. So you see roads closed off by Black Lives Matter activists; and see angry, tearful mothers leading chants. So you see young men who are being told their lives don’t matter, and they are better off dead because their only other option is prison – you see them respond with riots. So much anger is bottled up.

And this isn’t new. Not new history. Regardless of what the media says, or what anyone younger than 50 believes. Many of us here today lived this once, and here it is again.

Listen to these prophetic words of history: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was “well timed” in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word “Wait!” It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This “Wait” has almost always meant “Never.” We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that “justice too long delayed is justice denied.”

… there are two types of laws: just and unjust. I would be the first to advocate obeying just laws. One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that “an unjust law is no law at all.”

Now, what is the difference between the two? How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law. Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust…

[There is] nothing new about this kind of civil disobedience [you’ve seen.] It was evidenced sublimely in the refusal of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego to obey the laws of Nebuchadnezzar, on the ground that a higher moral law was at stake. It was practiced superbly by the early Christians, who were willing to face hungry lions and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than submit to certain unjust laws of the Roman Empire… In our own nation, the Boston Tea Party represented a massive act of civil disobedience.

We should never forget that everything Adolf Hitler did in Germany was “legal” … It was “illegal” to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler’s Germany…

I must make two honest confessions to you, my Christian and Jewish brothers. First, I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.”

These were penned by Martin Luther King Jr., in his letter from Birmingham Alabama jail, to the pastors who opposed his activism.

These words, minus some of the terminology, and location, are still true today.

Why are there protests and anger? Why is Black Lives Matter an organization and why are there sit-ins, demonstrations, and law breaking?

Because – there is a crisis going on, and only 1/3 of us suffer it. There is a crisis going on, and until it is a crisis for more of us, we will keep being lukewarm, white, moderates who delay and delay justice — therefore, making justice denied. Even though we mean well, and are sympathetic: justice delayed is justice denied.

Today – in our reading – Jesus and a lukewarm moderate square off. The leader of the synagogue is indignant. This woman who was healed was ill for 18 years – what was one more day? Six days of the week it’s good to heal and work to help others. Why couldn’t Jesus wait less than 24 hours? Why did he break the Sabbath?

The issue isn’t that the woman ought not to be healed. The issue isn’t that things need to change so that officers ought to treat all citizens fairly. The issue is WHEN the woman should be healed; and WHEN the cops will be held accountable. The issue is how long can justice be delayed?

Jesus said justice should never be delayed. The time is NOW. The kindom is near. NOW is the time for action. NOW the harvest is ripe. NOW we must act. For 18 years this woman was bent over and crippled.

What was one more day?

To the Rabbi who didn’t suffer — nothing.

To Jesus who knows how we suffer — everything.

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968. Almost fifty years have passed. What is one more day of things not changing? In his day, he said 380 years have passed while blacks were treated as less than whites. What is one more day?

For many – one more day is nothing. Wait. To them, they do not suffer.

For us – for the Body of Christ – one more day is everything. Act now! We suffer!

Remember! “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” We are one body.

But who am I? You’ve got to ask. I’m just me. Most of us consider ourselves plain ‘white.’ We don’t know any cops who are racists, we don’t know anyone who has been profiled, abused, or shot at by cops. In fact, this whole Black Lives Matter thing is a nuisance, a pain, someone else’s crisis and nothing we want to deal with.

I hear you.

*I* don’t know a bad cop.

But what I don’t know, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.

When my ear tells me there is a bee nearby, I look for it with my eye. I don’t assume my ear is lying. When I taste a tomato, I don’t hold it to my ear and get mad it doesn’t sound like how it tastes. Different parts of our bodies experience life differently.

Our body, our Christ body, is crying out and pointing out what life is like for many, many non-Whites. Are we going to say to our eyes or ears we don’t need you? Shut up, go away, and keep waiting for another time for your justice?

Or are we going to listen to Jeremiah, listen to Luke, listen to our Christ who says: there is NO ONE too small. With God, we HAVE the power. We ARE the power to change the world. With God, all things are possible.

When is the time for justice?

When is the time for action?

When is the time to say no to ISD Records, to the KKK, to the mediocre, sympathetic but uninvolved moderate white life style we live? Now!

Now we wake up. Now we take action. Now we stand with our siblings who cry out that black lives matter, too! NOW we bring liberty to the oppressed, set the captive free, and proclaim the time of the Lord! Amen.

Peaceful Feet

Philippians 1:3-11
Luke 1:68-79

Elderly Elizabeth and elderly Zechariah had no children. Elizabeth prayed for a child; and Zechariah received a vision of the future child that struck him deaf and mute.

This elderly couple have been waiting, and waiting, nine long months. For the last few months, Elizabeth’s young, young relative Mary has been pregnant. Mary has said the child is the Son of God, and the baby inside Elizabeth jumped with joy.

Now at last the time has come for that happy jumping baby to be born – and for more miracles happen!

It was a miracle that this elderly couple who’d never been able to have children suddenly became pregnant.

It was a miracle that took Zechariah’s speech and hearing: but he hasn’t been able to communicate what occurred yet.

It is a miracle that in a time when great numbers of healthy, young teen women die in childbirth, this elderly frail woman gives birth without complications to a healthy little boy.

But the miracles aren’t done yet.

Usually, people ask the father in ancient Jewish societies: What will be the name of the child? By naming the child, the father affirms the child is his own and part of his household.

But Elizabeth breaks custom. She declares, “This child is named John.” Which means, God is Gracious— God is generous and good.

The people around Elizabeth cry out, “John?! There are no ‘Johns’ in your family! Shouldn’t he be Zechariah Junior? Or named after your father, or your brother? Someone, go try to ask Zechariah!”

So they go to elderly Zachariah, and “make signs at him.” Zechariah motions for a writing tablet, and writes, “His name is John.”

Now the whole town is in an uproar! Zachariah chose the same name – had he been able to talk with Elizabeth before hand – or did he miraculously choose the same name?!

Everyone begins to ask: Who is this boy? What will he become?

We normally ask the same questions of all children – who is this child? What will this child become as an adult? But the town’s people are asking this in fear. They are scared. What do these signs mean and just who is this kid?

And to their even greater astonishment and fear: Zechariah’s lips and ears open and he can talk and hear again. And he says today’s prophecy in Luke:

“you, child, will be called
the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord
to prepare his ways,
to give knowledge of salvation
to his people by the forgiveness
of their sins.
By the tender mercy of our God,
the dawn from on high
will break upon us,
to give light to those
who sit in darkness and
in the shadow of death,
to guide our feet into the way of peace.”

And Zechariah recounts how God has always been faithful, always done as God has promised, and always remembered the holy covenant between people and God — this mutual promise of love and support between people and God.

Zechariah speaks of God’s salvation, forgiveness, tender mercy… and calls his son God is Gracious. Zachariah speaks of peace to the people’s fear. He foretells the salvation of God’s people through a revelation that will teach them to walk in the way of peace.

For the first of many times in Luke’s gospel, salvation and peace, God’s kindom and peace, are tied together. As we spoke in our call to worship: If there is to be peace in the world… there must be peace in the heart.

And peace of heart, for peace for the home, neighbors, city, nation and world is what John is to announce is coming. A peace that transcends all understanding. A peace from God God’s self.

John, little baby John, being raised by people old enough to be his grandparents, shall be the one who announces the coming of the Lord.

And we know John grows up and does just this – through John, God prepares the way for God’s own self becoming incarnate in John’s relative Jesus. The two don’t seem to grow up together — John is raised in the wilderness, and doesn’t know who Jesus is when Jesus comes to be baptized — but these two surely are walking with God and the great work God begins in them before they are even born continues even to this very moment.

This great work is preparing the world for the Day of Christ; the kin-dom of God on Earth as it is in Heaven; preparing the world for peace.

Before we begin singing ‘Give Peace A Chance’ or ‘Kumbaya’ … You may remind me that Jesus said in Matthew “Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.”

… And an pretty angry Jesus literally chased people with a whip.

… And Jesus told his disciples in Luke to sell their cloaks for swords.

Perhaps the way of peace is divisive. Perhaps the way of peace is like a sword, and it cuts — divides – sharpens.

We often think peace is the same as stillness. A peaceful Christmas night is a night of quiet snow, twinkling bright stars, and a holy hush broken only by the sound of our breath.

But the way of peace, the road of God, is rarely still and motionless. The way of peace challenges the way things are. Think of these “peaceful” moments of the Bible:

The angels who announce the birth of Christ SING “Peace on Earth and Goodwill to all.” The sky is full of their song and delight. This peace is active, lively, bright – and scares the shepherds. But their song of peace prepares the way for the shepherds to greet the born Messiah and share the good news.

The peace Jesus gives others causes great unrest. Remember when the sinful woman with the expensive perfume busts into the dinner banquet to weep on Jesus’ feet and anoint them with the perfume and her kisses. What a stir she caused! What a lack of peace! How could someone so dirty, so foul, touch a prophet?! And Jesus, instead of being angry with her, praises her deeds, tells her that her sins are forgiven, and says, “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”

And the woman dragged into court before all the men, dragged before Jesus and accused of adultery – the crowd stated: we must stone her to death, right Jesus? But Jesus was peaceful, and quietly replied, “Let the one without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” And bit by bit, beginning with the eldest of the men, the crowd left until just she was left in the center of the court. And Jesus said he did not condemn her, and let her go in peace.

Peace, Jesus tells the men on the way to Damascus.

Peace, Jesus insists when Judas betrays him and Jesus’ disciples try to raise swords to defend Jesus.

Peace, Jesus shows in the courts.

Peace, for Jesus, is actively doing justice, actively forgiving, actively bringing not stillness – but peace to our souls.

A peaceful soul is a soul that has listened to the little small voice of the Holy Spirit which ever whispers inside us.

The peaceful soul is a soul with a clear conscious.

And that peaceful soul is likely NOT living a passive life. A peaceful soul is a soul that is living an active and engaging life actively bringing about peace, justice, truth and clearing the way for God’s salvation, God’s grace, to shine ever brighter on the world.

A peaceful soul is a soul that is walking on peaceful feet, doing peaceful deeds, and always on the move spreading God’s shalom.

What is shalom?

It is more than what peace means in English. And shalom is what we’re translating as peace in our Bible.

Shalom is completion. Wholeness. Full health. It is having every dish clean and matching. It is a perfect sunset on a perfect day. It is a engine that always starts on the first try. It is a completed card or DVD collection. It is to be restored. To be washed clean of sins. It is to fall into the loving embrace of someone who you’ve made amends with and KNOW all is well.

This peace, this shalom, is, as Dr. Plantgina writes, “universal flourishing, wholeness and delight – a rich state of affairs in which natural needs are satisfied and natural gifts fruitfully employed, a state of affairs that inspires joyful wonder as its Creator and Savior opens doors and welcomes [all]… it is the way things ought to be.”

This active, moving, lavish peace John came announcing, Jesus made possible, and we are invited to share.

So get up and use your peaceful feet this week! Share shalom. Amen.

Perversion of Justice

Isaiah 53:4-12

Mark 10:35-45

The man of constant sorrows, the suffering servant of Isaiah, is never identified. He is alluded to as like Moses, like Ezekiel, but more. We Christians know the suffering servant as Jesus. But the text does not say this. The text never names the person.

By not naming the person, we Christians not only can use the text as a prophecy about Jesus… but also read the text as speaking about all the people who are outcasts. For you see, Jesus says what we do to the least we have done to him.

The person in Isaiah is described as unwelcome in society. He or she isn’t pretty. They are dirty. They have sores. Even though he or she does nothing wrong, we don’t like them.

So we abuse the individual. We turn our faces from him or her so we can’t see them. We ignore them. We pretend they are dead. We throw them out of our community.

… Who is not pretty? Who is dirty or has sores? Who, just by their very presence, gets us irritated and we pretend not to see them?

Did you know when famous people visit an area, police usually go ahead of them a day or two ahead of time and clean out ‘the undesirables.’ You know — panhandlers, homeless, the mentally ill, and the poor? People who we want to pretend we don’t see. People who just their presence is offensive.

Have you heard bad comments about people who are on food stamps, WIC, or social security? Do you turn your eyes away from the the beggar so you don’t ‘see’ him?

Isaiah goes on to say that these vulnerable people then get beat.

And they do.

Violence against the homeless, the mentally ill, the poor is so much higher than violence against other groups. Abusive parents raise children who only know how to be abusive. Poverty makes thieves. Mental illness makes a person homeless as they turn away all help and burn bridges in their episodes.

The police get involved in Isiah.

As they do now a days too. And when the police show up, they are much more likely to say the homeless, the poor, or the mentally ill brought about the beating on themselves than they are to say the more affluent, cleaner, more respectable person did wrong. Who are you going to believe? The soccer mom or the homeless wino?

We don’t mean to, but assumptions of character based on how people appear slip into all our judgments. Police are people too, and so although the try to be neutral… they, too, slip into assumptions. I am not siding against police. I am the granddaughter and niece of officers. I am saying police are human and humans make assumptions.

Assumptions are what the #blacklivesmatter movement is about. Assumptions are what feminism is about. Assumptions are what movements like these are trying to combat. The normal person assumes all people are treated equally and get the treatment they deserve… but that simply is not true.

In Isaiah, the servant is sent to trial and justice is perverted. Justice isn’t done. We founded out nation as a nation with liberty and justice for all — yet we have more people incarcerated than any other country. 2.5 million! .91% of our population. So 1 for every 110 people are in prison or jail at this moment. 1/31 on parole, 1/3 have a criminal record.

If you have criminal records, are on parole, or in prison or have been in prison… it is very, very hard to get employed. To have a life. Even if you change and don’t get in trouble with the law anymore… you are cast out of society.

A stupid decision at 18 means a life of poverty, hardship and a temptation to do worse crimes waits you for the rest of your life.

Mandatory sentencing for drugs means a single marijuana cigarette at 18 can lead to 70 years in prison. Who among us made smart choices at 18?! Why is that kid who made a single bad choice spending more time in prison than a man who chose to murder or rape another?

Justice is often perverted. Messed up. Not done. Even though we all try to do justice, and to uphold our laws, and write laws to bring about justice…

… too often, justice is not done.

Seed saving is one of my personal interests. You know — collecting some seed from this year’s crops and reusing it next year. Now you know if you sign an agreement with a seed company, like Monsanto or Syngenta, you’re not allowed to save seed and plant it the next year. The company owns the seeds as a patent. This makes sense to me. They designed the seeds. They own the seeds.

What doesn’t make sense to me is that they have a patent on the genes of the seeds and own wherever those genes go.

So take the case of 75 year old Vernon Bowman. He went to the grain elevator, bought some soy, and planted his field. He didn’t know some of the seed in the grain elevator was from RoundUp Ready crops. Crops whose seed was owned by Monsanto. So after he planted his field, he was sued. He was accused of purposefully robbing Monsanto, and the courts agreed. He’s the 410th farmer Monsanto has sued.

In some of these 410 cases justice was done. But not all of them. I think Bowman wasn’t intentionally stealing. But this elderly man now has a criminal record.

In Canada, the canola is a worst deal. A few years back a RoundUp Ready crop was planted on one side of the road by one farmer, and another planted a regular crop on the other side of the road. When Monsanto came out a few years later, they found their genes were in both crops. The farmer who didn’t sign a contract was sued. He was adamant that he never planted RoundUp Ready crops. But he saves his seed and replants some year after year. The courts decided that the two crops had cross pollinated over the years and although the seed-saving farmer had done nothing wrong at all… he was ordered to burn his crop.

He then was told to start with fresh seed and to leave an open fallow area between himself and the RoundUp Ready crops if he didn’t want cross pollination to happen again.

“Shouldn’t the RoundUp Ready crops leave a fallow space so they don’t contaminate the others?”

No.

That farmer lost crops, lost seed, and lost land.

The same pollination issues are happening in south America. Native corn crops are being burned because they have cross pollinated with GMO crops. The GMO seeds are five times more expensive than local corn. So poor people plant the local corn. But the local corn, like the corn in the grain elevator, is mixed with patented corn. Then the poor can’t afford a lawyer to defend their crops. And their crops get burned. And they are poorer than when they began. They starve if they plant seed and they starve if they don’t plant seed. And they starve because they cannot afford the GMO patent and cannot find corn that hasn’t been pollinated by GMOs.

These are the crazy kind of injustices that get me so angry. I know Monsanto, Syngenta, and other big names are doing great work and feeding more of us than ever was once possible — and I also know what kind of insane injustice is happening too.

Right now, the way our court system is set up, since genes themselves are patented and the company who owns the patent owns where the genes show up… it means a court someday may decide that our pigs who eat RoundUp ready crops belong to Monsanto. Or us — when we eat the pigs — get the genes in us and now we belong to the company. That’s ridiculous! But that’s how the law is being applied.

Neither me, nor, do I think, any of these seed companies, want this. They want their research protected. Local small farmers want to not starve. I want justice to be done. But sometimes all these desires get awful muddled when we get to court.

Justice, in courts, can get so perverted. So messed up.

I saw injustice in the courts most recently with a trial over children. Mom and dad divorced and shared custody of the kids. But mom wanted full custody. Dad said no, he wanted to share. The judge said, “Why are you trying to keep these children from their mother where they naturally belong?”

… Sexism in the court. It happens very frequently. Even if a mother is dangerous — has a drug habit, an unstable job, and many boyfriends — she is preferred over males to raise the children because the mother is where kids naturally belong.

Please — sometimes dad is the better parent!

Assumptions.

The judge assumed the woman had to be a good mother since she was a woman while the father wasn’t a good father since he was a man.

The judges assumed the farmers who saved seeds and replanted them were trying to steal from a company. Assumed the farmers were thieves.

Assumptions.

We all make them. God forgive us when our assumptions cause injustice and pain!

The suffering servant in Isaiah is assumed to be nothing, and he is dealt injustice, and he is murdered. People assumed Jesus was trying to start a rebellion against Rome, assumed he was speaking blasphemy when he said he was the Son of God, and he was murdered. People every day are assumed to be worthless, they are dealt with unjustly, and they get murdered.

Our jobs, as Christians, is to understand that injustice happens and will continue to happen until Christ comes again. It is our job to listen with ears that aren’t full of wax and dirt. Ears that are clean of past assumptions, clean of old hurts, clean to hear someone’s story anew.

Our job is to see Christ in the suffering servants of the world. To see someone who is poor and instead of thinking ‘what did they do to become poor’ think ‘there is Christ. Let me greet him.’

It’s our job to hear someone has done time in jail, or prison, and to treat that person as fully human. Fully worthy. Not a less-than. Not someone to bypass. You don’t know what they did. You don’t know how they’ve changed. You don’t know if they were there unjustly.

I am not arguing for you to assume everyone you meet is a saint. Oh no — there are bad people out there. Use your wisdom. I am arguing to be aware of your assumptions.

And when your assumptions lead you astray, be humble enough like the authors of Isaiah who wrote how wrong they had been. They wrote, “Who will believe us?” Who will believe the revelation that we have had ? Who will believe that the one we accounted as nothing is actually one of God’s great? Jesus told us again and again, and again in today’s reading, that those who are little… the servants, the people we overlook, the ones who the world ignores… are the ones God honors and calls great.

It isn’t human nature to NOT discriminate. It is godly nature. So we have to work at not discriminating, we have to practice.

Our Lord walks among us now. Will we greet him or tell him to beat it and get a job? Will we wash his feet and welcome him or tell him to get a hair cut and leave us alone? Will we greet him with palm fronds or handcuffs?

Our Lord walks among us. Is suffering injustices now. Will we walk with him or will we be the first to cast stones at him?

May we practice not discriminating. May we ask God for forgiveness when our assumptions hurt ourselves or others. May we always strive to be better disciples of Christ.

Amen.

Given to Saint Michael’s United Church of Christ, Baltimore, OH, 10-18-15