Tag: Homeless

Let Me Rest

Matthew 25:1-13 

jerusalem-israel-oil-lamps
Lamp, 100 CE, Israel – Palestine, Jerusalem dig

The disciples ask Jesus, What sign are we to watch for – what is the coming of the Kin-dom of Heaven like? And Jesus tells them several chapters about just that. Today, we hear the parable of the 10 bridesmaids, or 10 virgins, 10 young women.

It goes like this: The coming of the kin-dom of heaven is like ten women who have been asked to bring in the bridegroom. They are to guide him through the winding streets in a parade to the wedding banquet where the beautiful bride awaits. All of the women come with their lamps – these are the signs of the procession. Think of a lamp hung on a stick you carry up above your head for lighting the path. It makes quite the show. Five of those who came actually brought oil to light these showy parade items and make them functional – in case the groom comes over night. Five of these women brought the lamps to be part of the parade, but didn’t bother with the heavy lamp oil. Maybe they figured since they left in the daytime, the groom would be along shortly. Who wants a parade and wedding feast at an unexpected hour like 2 or 3 in the morning?

But, as we hear, the parade is delayed because the bridegroom is delayed. As night comes, all ten women fall asleep waiting. The wise and the foolish both sleep.

In the middle of the night, someone shouts, “Here comes the groom! Come on out to meet him!” Everyone got to their feet to ready for the celebratory parade. They got their lamps and hung them on their poles, trimmed up the wicks, and got ready to be the light to guide in the bridal parade to the party.

But only five of the women were actually ready to do this. They thought they had an easy and fun job only. They brought the lamps, the symbols of their roles, but not actually the heavy and messy oil to put IN the lamps. The other five women had brought the messy and heavy oil and are ready to do the job they were asked to do.

The foolish women who realize they actually needed to participate in this, and not just show up, ask for some of the oil. But the wise women reply, “There’s not enough to go around.” If all ten lamps are lit with the oil, the oil will run out before they guide the wedding party to the banquet hall. Better to have 5 lamps last the whole way than 10 lamps that die out half way there and leave everyone stumbling in the dark. So the wise say, “You best go prepare now.”

But while the foolish women were gone getting oil, the groom came close enough for the parade to start. And so it did. And the five guides lead the people along to the party.

Meanwhile, the foolish women get their lamps started and come running back to the party, late, saying, “We’re ready to help with the parade! Look! We have our guide lamps lit!”

But the groom said, “It’s too late. The time for that has already passed. I don’t need bridesmaids to guide people anymore for the party has already started.”

And the bridesmaids were very sad and cried.

Now, normally, I hear this preached with the punch line: therefore stay awake! Stay vigilant! Keep watch!

You never know when Christ will return!

NEVER REST! NEVER SLEEP! WATCH! KEEP ALERT!

But you know what, I’m tired.

Always being vigilant, always on edge – that means always stressing. People who are in war zones and who must always be alert suffer from all kinds of physical and mental harm from constantly being “on” and unable to turn off. Resting is one of the hard parts for our veterans coming home to adjust to, and do – because they’re so used to being “on.”

It works for a computer – turn it off, let it rest, plug it back in again – it works for us, too. We need rest. Does Jesus want us to wait with such expectation that we all start showing the Blue Screens of Death?

We need to sleep sometimes.

Always being in emergency mode means our minds begin to re-write themselves to thinking this over-load of adrenalin and cortisone – this load of stress hormones – is normal. So we freak out even more easily next time something stressful happens. Sometimes we even begin to crave chaos and stress.

Our bodies age rapidly from these strong chemicals and we get aches, pains, high blood pressure and low immune systems. We turn to self medication to help us get by – alcohol, cigarettes, another cup of coffee, eating too much or too little, sleeping too much or too little.

We get to feeling isolated, lonely, overwhelmed, angry.

Since Jesus is our good shepherd, who wants the best for us, and offers us to lie down in green pastures, who invites us to dine with him, I cannot think he was advocating we live our entire life in fear of the rapture, the End, and the return of Christ. I cannot think he was telling us to suffer from constant stress because we’re Christians.

The kindom of heaven is like ten bridesmaids… who fell asleep. Christ, the groom, came while they were sleeping.

So the difference is not who took a rest and who didn’t. All ten slept. The difference is who prepared for waiting and who didn’t. Who came ready to work, and who didn’t.

Some of the women came not just with the symbols of their job – the lamps – but also came with the hard part of the job, too – the oil.

Some Christians have the symbols of their faith – Easter, Christmas, maybe a cross – but wise Christians do the hard part of the faith too – the whole loving others bit.

When Christ arrives, it is too late to suddenly go “be” Christian. The time for action is now. The bridesmaids who remembered they are to be guides – day and night – with their lanterns are able to respond to the call. They can rise and go. The women who were only committed for the good parts aren’t able to rise and go and participate. They have to go get oil. They have to go prepare, although the time for preparing has already passed.

The wise Christians come at the call, guide with their lamps, and enter the wedding party. Enter into Christ’s presence. The foolish Christians are delayed in responding to the call, and by the time they get their act together and come saying “I’m ready to walk with Christ now and do all that love-your-neighbor-stuff!” Christ tells them, “The time for that is passed. The party is already going on now.”

Often I hear this talked about in terms of the Last Days. I had a great-uncle who liked to sit us kids down and somewhat terrify us with images of The Apocalypse: The Day of Judgment: THE return. Picture that in the strongest Appalachian accent you can, now. And he liked to tell us about how death comes suddenly, unexpectantly, and you need to get right with Jesus NOW. Because you can’t get right with Jesus after you die. And he’d tell us that the Final Day will be essentially the cutting off line for everyone. No more chances to get it right. You either are in the party, or you’re not. Either Saved or Not.

Yes – one can understand this parable that way.

I understand it a bit differently. See, Christ was, and Christ will come again… but Christ also IS. Christ IS Risen. Christ told this parable. Christ will one day bring the full reign of God on earth as it is in Heaven. But Christ also is here, right now, as near as our shadows.

I think the clarion, the call to action, to rise up from our sleep and trim our lamps, is happening every day; because we encounter Christ every day.

Where? Lord? I did not see you?

What you do to the least of these you do to me.

Every day, we see some chance to step up and guide the kin-dom of God into the world. Every day, we see Christ. Some of us are prepared to act. Prepared to guide. Prepared to minister and amplify the voices of the silenced and be present for one another. And some of us… are not.

I’m not saying we’re doing this because we’re mean. Nor are we doing this out of blindness and not aware of the needs in our community and world.

No.

We’re tired.

I bet those five bridesmaids who didn’t lug the heavy oil were tired.

Had they known the wait was going to be that long, they would have brought the oil. But they judged the odds, compared how likely it was that the groom would come in the day or the night, and chose. They chose wrong. But I don’t think it was that they meant to be wrong.

They just… are mortals. Fallible. And tire.

When we’re in constant stress mode, our reserves are all drained out. Not just our physical reserves, but our emotional and spiritual too. If we know someone really truly needs us, we’re there for them! … But it’s the casual encounters, the strangers, the hard to notice people who society makes invisible… it’s they we forget. They we don’t prepare for. But it is they who are Christ, the groom, coming into our lives at unexpected times.

They are the sick. Colds never come on our schedules. Dementia is not wrote on our calendar “Oh, Dec 2017, time for a stroke!” Those with long-term illnesses are the most forgotten. Those suffering from depression, lack of mobility, and… that one we hate to admit the most… being old.

They are the imprisoned. Where are our prisoners? Who tells them of Christ’s love and forgiveness and mercy? Who welcomes in people with criminal records and says, ‘Yes, you can work here,’ ‘Yes, you may have a loan,’ ‘Yes, you are welcome.’ Incarceration may last five years inside a prison, but it is a life-long sentence.

They are the naked and hungry. Poverty is one of those things we try to hide. We as a society shame people in poverty and tell them it is their fault so we don’t have to see them. Seeing them makes us feel badly about our own wealth. We pass rules banning people from loitering and panhandling and yet don’t provide shelters that are open 24/7. Where are these people to go? Work. Get a job. Ever been unemployed and looking for a job? Try looking for a job without a phone, a mailing address, shower, warm meal, and reliable transportation. Then add maybe a criminal record or a illness you can’t afford the medication to treat.

You and I – we can’t respond – can’t reach out and help others – when our lamps are empty. When we’re running on fumes. We need time to fill ourselves with oil so we can be lamps to others.

We need time to rest, to sleep, to be able to serve.

We are getting ready to enter the holiday season. Thanksgiving and Christmas and New Years. Does the thought make you tired?

Then it is time for change. Time for rest. Time to build up those oil reserves.

For every day we are supposed to listen for the call – but we’ll only be able to respond if we’re ready.

Take time to be holy.

Take time to be still.

Take time to rest in the peace of God.

Amen.

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Wisdom is Known by Her Deeds

nadia-bolz-weber---civil-unions-2
Rev. Nadia Bolz-Weber

Genesis 24:34-38, 42-49, 58-67
Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30

I recently read a sermon by Rev. Darrel Lakey called “Christian, you are upset about the wrong things.” To make his point, he uses a cuss word: ‘last night, 30,000 children died of starvation and most of you don’t give a …” And if your first response is: a pastor shouldn’t say such words…

… and here I am, not saying it…

… then his point is made: you and I are upset about the wrong things. Upset a pastor is cussing instead of how many children died.

He goes on to show, powerfully, how what we get upset about and argue about so often is the wrong thing – the wrong part of the problem. He doesn’t say cussing is good- but rather, we are spending our energy in inefficient, wasteful ways.

Correcting a person for a cuss word isn’t going to make much of a difference in the world.

Giving someone a meal is going to make some difference.

Changing the world so that food is more fairly distributed will make a world of difference.

Why get in a ruffle over the word, and instead, focus on the message? And then do something!

In our reading, Jesus, too, points out how people are upset with the wrong things and wasting their energy on appearances rather than on real issues.

He recalls to us John.

John ate honey and bugs. People were upset with him – anyone who eats such things must be demon possessed! They were upset with his appearances. When they should have been upset with the fact John had to preach his message in the desert and it couldn’t be received in the city. In fact, when he came to the city, he was murdered for his message.

So Jesus now points to himself, and says – after John, people became upset with me and my appearance. Not because I’m eating honey and bugs, but regular bread and wine like everyone else. But they say say I’m a drunkard and a glutton. And they’re upset I spend time with sinners.

People, then and now, are upset about the wrong things. People should have been upset that their religious institutions didn’t have space for sinners and thought sinners shouldn’t have access to a rabbi. They should have been upset that there isn’t enough food and drink for all to have in abundance. They should have been paying attention not to the inside of the vessels, as Jesus later says, instead of the outside. They should, and we should, know wisdom – know people – not by how they look, but by their deeds.

Wisdom is known by her deeds.

Not her appearance.

The deeds of John. The deeds of Jesus. The deeds that speak of God’s radical acceptance, generous hospitality, and abiding forgiveness. The deeds that speak Love.

Giving John a bath wasn’t the fix. Fixing the institutions driving him into the desert was. Telling Jesus to avoid sinners wasn’t the fix. Offering acceptance and welcome and forgiveness to sinners is.

Are you upset about tattoos, piercings, or cussing? I know very faithful pastors with so many tattoos, their arms are covered in as if in a sleeve. Others have multiple piercings. Some, like the one I opened with, cuss in their sermons. Should we be upset about their looks, or upset that LOOKS can deny you a job? Or housing? Or even healthcare? Does a person immediately become a better or worse worker because of a tattoo? If so – sign me up for the tattoo to make me more organized!

… Ageism is a huge appearance struggle in our country. Rather than being welcomed as a person with experience, those who are aged are seen as incompetent. And a younger person is chosen for a job… even though both applicants are qualified.

There’s a reason hair dye for men and women sell and turn a profit.

So what do we get upset about? Tell people who look older to go away and leave us alone?

Some churches concerned about this have started day cares that primarily employ elderly  so that the very young and the very old share a day together. Yes, it’s chaotic. Yes, it’s messy. Yes, it’s hard work! But… the wizened are valued for their knowledge… and the next generation are taught that aging is a good thing.

This is how to change our world: through taking action. Changing relationships. Changing minds. Being upset about the same things that upset Jesus, and then, like Jesus, taking action.

I went to Washington DC once as a child, like many of us go. I was told to avoid the subway because it was full of “undesirables.” My mother and another mother were so offended by this word, they cut out of the official tour to take their daughters on the subway. And we saw workers, and peddlers. We saw people without homes and people in business suits. We saw Washington DC without the spit and shine of the tour company guiding us. And it was beautiful. A city of diversity.

It was also stunning and horrifying. A city with twice the average homelessness rate – 124 people – men, women, and their children – per 10,000 citizens. Homelessness so high that people can register cross roads as their mailing addresses. A city with four of the richest counties in the nation – averaging incomes of $70,000 a home. And a city where the rich live elsewhere and drive in, while the locals who are poor or middle income ride the subs. And the policy makers, the rich, never see them.

Indeed, if the tourist papers warning us of “undesirables” is any evidence, then this is very purposeful. Purposefully avoiding the “lowers.”

This was a community service trip. If anything, we should have been right there on the streets learning from the common people the wrongs the people in charge are doing to them. Learning what would really make their lives better – like access to free showers, and safe places to sleep. We should have been upset that we live in the richest country in the world and there are plenty who still starve… because those with money and food CHOOSE to ignore their need and CHOOSE instead to focus on their looks.

Are we angry, upset, with what we ought to be? Are we identifying the root of problems and rooting them out?

This is about taking responsibility for our action, and our INACTION. Our action in choosing to fight silly battles and our inaction to act with God’s grace, hospitality, witness and love.

Our Old Testament reading is a strange one to pair with today’s gospel, isn’t it? Except for the AGENCY, the action, the people in this love story have.

The first is the servant of Abraham. He could easily have chosen the first girl he came across as Isaac’s wife. However, he goes and prepares. He stands near a well which is where, in the old world, all true love stories begin. It is a trope. A theme. Then, he begins to pray. He prays for a woman to come who is so generous, she not only pulls up one jug of water for himself, but water for each of his camels. That is – twenty gallons of water for each of the twenty camels. ((Remember, the story of Isaac is one of laughter and humor. So of course this girl is a super strong woman with unheard of generosity!)) And he doesn’t care about her looks, or the clothes she wears, or if she speaks perfectly. Instead – he cares about her wise deeds. Her generosity.

And back in her father’s home? Her father does the unheard of – he ASKS his daughter if she wants to go marry the man. He gives her agency. He sees his daughter as a PERSON instead of just property.

It doesn’t matter to him that the man has told him Abraham is rich, and seen the jewelry given. He still wants this to be his daughter’s choice. And she chooses to go. And the Bible calls the relationship between Isaac and Rebecka as one of ‘love.’  One of the few relationships of the Bible called such.

Agency. Seeing others as PEOPLE instead of numbers, or undesirables, or enemies.

It’s seeing our aching world, and instead of saying ‘but what can I do?’ doing your own small part – whatever it is. Giving to the food pantries. Supporting world wide organizations like the UCC Great Hour of Sharing or the ANERA refugee fund. Doing small parts – like reading and hearing the stories of those displaced by war. Not ignoring. Even when reading and hearing is hard.

And it is practicing love. If people cannot feel welcome and accepted, loved and encouraged, forgiven and wanted here – in our church – where, then, can they find respite?

Jesus says his YOKE is light. Remember, he is on a mission saying the religious folk are heaping on burdens on the poor instead of lightening the burdens. And it’s our jobs to lighten burdens.

But a yoke isn’t freedom – not act however you will – it is a guide. Yoke yourself to me, Jesus says, and know a lighter burden. Know that with me, you can lay down your heavy burdens of getting upset over the wrong things.

You can take up the yoke, the work, of assisting the in breaking of God’s kindom.

You can spend your life doing more than correcting someone’s cussing for five minutes… or criticizing their clothes. You can tackle the real work of loving others and changing the world one relationship, one deed, one olive branch at a time.

It’s still work – but it is light work. Joyous work. Because it sets judgment and hypocrisy aside, and welcomes and rejoices with others. If one is starving, one is homeless, one is not welcome – our beloved Jesus is starting, homeless, and not welcomed. It is also foolish work – the work that the wise and intelligent often miss, but which children often see and do immediately.

It is the foolish work of dancing with those who dance. And mourning with those who cry. And being a friend.

Come, says Christ, and share this yoke. Share your burdens. In the sharing, all becomes lighter.

And that is wisdom.

Amen.

Source: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/unfundamentalistchristians/2017/06/christian-upset-wrong-things/

Who Is My Neighbor?

lovethyneighborPsalm 25:1-10
Luke 10:25-37

Fill in the blank:
“Into a bar walks a Rabbi, a Priest and a…” Minister.
“Moe, Larry and…” Curly.
Donald Duck’s nephews are Hey, Dewey and… Louie.
Not into cartoons? How about the movie: The Good, The Bad and… the ugly.

These sets of three we just KNOW. They’re tied together. Jesus’ time had them too. One of these sets of three was a Priest, A Levite and… an Israelite. So if you wanted to tell the bar joke, it would go: A Priest, A Levite and an Israelite walk into a bar…” Usually, the joke continued that the priest only wanted to study the law. The Levite only wanted to do the law. And only the Israelite is smart enough to both study God’s Word and do God’s word.

Jesus sets up this set of three in today’s story. First — the Priest passes the man in need. Then, the Levite passes the man in need. We know how the joke goes, right? Here comes the Israelite to save the day and do better than both of these ‘men of God.’

But instead of an Israelite, Jesus says the third person to come along is the backwards, persecuted, dirty, outsider Samaritan.

… it would be as shocking as if I opened with a joke going, “A Rabbi, A Priest, and an ISIS Suicide Bomber walk into a bar…” That’s not how the joke goes, and really… it’s crossing the line from joke to insulting.

… Politically correct was never Jesus’ way. Jesus’ way is God correct. Politically correct means to think about your words, and not use words that harm others. It’s a very good thing!

But God correct means speaking the Truth of God even when that truth is painful to hear, or acknowledge.

The lawyer — someone extremely educated in the scriptures and laws of the time — had asked Jesus, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” Instead of simply giving the lawyer the answer, Jesus did the true Rabbi thing of answering a question with a question.

Jesus asked, “What is written in the law? You’ve studied it a whole lot – how do you interpret it?” Both men acknowledge the Bible has a lot of ways to read it, and lots of different understandings. However, they have the same reading: to inherit eternal life, one must “love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.”

DOING this love is how one lives eternally.

But this is a lawyer. It’s his job to nail down the facts. So… just who is my neighbor? Just who am I responsible to love? And that’s when Jesus gets politically incorrect and tells his story about the Priest, the Levite, and the Enemy. “Which of these three, do you think, acted like a neighbor to the man?”

The lawyer cannot even bring himself to say “The Samaritan.” He can’t admit that dirty, dirty word; that enemy. He changes it to the softer but still true phrase, “The one who showed mercy.” Whomever was merciful.

Jesus’ answer?

Go and Do likewise. Go and Do.

Go and love your neighbor.
Thy homeless neighbor.
Thy Muslim neighbor.
Thy black neighbor.
Thy gay neighbor.
Thy white neighbor.
Thy Jewish neighbor.
Thy transgendered neighbor.
Thy Christian neighbor.
Thy Atheist neighbor.
Thy racist neighbor.
Thy addicted neighbor.
Thy neighbor.

Love them. Show them kindness and mercy. Love yourself. Show yourself kindness and mercy. Love God – by showing all of God’s children the very same kindness and mercy God has shown you.

When Jesus tells this story, Jesus never identifies who the man is other than what crime happened against him. He was beat up by robbers who took everything he owned. The man is stripped of anything to identify him: he may be Jewish, he may be a Priest, he may be a Levite, he may be a Samaritan. He could be rich or poor. Young or old. Jesus keeps the details sparse so we can imagine ourselves as the man.

When you are so, so desperate for help… your neighbor is ANYONE who helps you out.

I read about a church where a woman was going through a messy divorce. Her fellow church members told her, “Keep your chin up. God will take care of you.” Her minister told her, “We are praying for you.” There was another woman in the community who had three kids who didn’t name anyone as their dads. She went to the woman and said, “Let’s get coffee; I’ll buy. Bring your kids, they can play with mine. You need a friend and I want to be one.”

Everyone in the church was well meaning, but none went out of their way to help. The outsider, the stranger, the one judged… she went out of her way to someone not like herself. But she knew what it was like to need a friend; what it was like to raise kids all by yourself; and she acted as this woman’s neighbor.

Who our actual next door neighbors are isn’t the message of this parable. Rather, it is about who is acting neighborly: a neighbor is anyone and everyone who goes out of their way to help another. Anyone and everyone who provides for our needs and who takes care of us.

Jesus’ story goes two ways then: it asks, are we neighbors? and who are our neighbors? In other words… are you going out of your way to help others; and are you letting others go out of their way to help you?

It’s that second one that really sticks in my craw; you too?

I spent a lot of time and energy trying to be invulnerable. Trying to be a self-sustaining one-woman island. I don’t need other’s help – I’m fine. I HELP OTHERS. OTHERS don’t help me. I donate to charity. I don’t take charity. I give out favors. I don’t rack up debts. I never want to be a burden. I give compliments, I don’t take them and I assuredly don’t take your pity and aide.

*tch* We rural folk, we’re strong. We survive it all. And this do-or-die-independence Jesus challenges. Jesus says being a neighbor involves not only giving help, but also being willing to receive it — and receive it especially from those not part of our immediate family and friends.

That hits me right in the chest.

When Jesus invites us into this parable as the beaten man, Jesus points out we’re all vulnerable. We all have times when we NEED assistance and help. We all have times when there are too many bills, or too much house work, or our bodies aren’t working as they ought, or we just are sad or lonely. We have times we’re stuck in the gutter and left in the ditch. And most of us choose to stay there, drag ourselves out, wallow in the mud, get infected wounds and suffer… rather than lifting a hand up and asking for help. Asking for someone to lift us back to our feet.

We ask God, if we ask anyone at all.

But what if God is working through those around us, and the answer to our prayer: God, help me through this! is God placing helpful people willing to be our neighbors in our lives?

Our psalmist writes, “God leads the humble in what is right, and teaches the humble God’s way. All the paths of God are steadfast love and faithfulness,” Humble. Humble enough to give love. Humble enough to receive love.

It isn’t often socially acceptable to receive help… as in, by asking for help or receiving help you’re somehow less than others… but this humility and openness is a necessary way of following God’s path.

It is through giving AND receiving help, we build a web among us, a community among us. We knit the body of Christ closer and closer. One who only gives, and one who only receives, is like a dropped stitch; or like a tractor that only has forward or reverse but not both. You can work around a dropped stitch or a tractor missing gears… but it’s a whole lot harder than if you just had both. Giving and receiving, receiving and giving, is what makes us neighbors. So go and be loved by your neighbor!

Be open to being loved by
Thy homeless neighbor.
Thy Muslim neighbor.
Thy black neighbor.
Thy gay neighbor.
Thy white neighbor.
Thy Jewish neighbor.
Thy transgendered neighbor.
Thy Christian neighbor.
Thy Atheist neighbor.
Thy racist neighbor.
Thy addicted neighbor.
Thy neighbor.

And do likewise. Love them back. Amen.

Perversion of Justice

Isaiah 53:4-12

Mark 10:35-45

The man of constant sorrows, the suffering servant of Isaiah, is never identified. He is alluded to as like Moses, like Ezekiel, but more. We Christians know the suffering servant as Jesus. But the text does not say this. The text never names the person.

By not naming the person, we Christians not only can use the text as a prophecy about Jesus… but also read the text as speaking about all the people who are outcasts. For you see, Jesus says what we do to the least we have done to him.

The person in Isaiah is described as unwelcome in society. He or she isn’t pretty. They are dirty. They have sores. Even though he or she does nothing wrong, we don’t like them.

So we abuse the individual. We turn our faces from him or her so we can’t see them. We ignore them. We pretend they are dead. We throw them out of our community.

… Who is not pretty? Who is dirty or has sores? Who, just by their very presence, gets us irritated and we pretend not to see them?

Did you know when famous people visit an area, police usually go ahead of them a day or two ahead of time and clean out ‘the undesirables.’ You know — panhandlers, homeless, the mentally ill, and the poor? People who we want to pretend we don’t see. People who just their presence is offensive.

Have you heard bad comments about people who are on food stamps, WIC, or social security? Do you turn your eyes away from the the beggar so you don’t ‘see’ him?

Isaiah goes on to say that these vulnerable people then get beat.

And they do.

Violence against the homeless, the mentally ill, the poor is so much higher than violence against other groups. Abusive parents raise children who only know how to be abusive. Poverty makes thieves. Mental illness makes a person homeless as they turn away all help and burn bridges in their episodes.

The police get involved in Isiah.

As they do now a days too. And when the police show up, they are much more likely to say the homeless, the poor, or the mentally ill brought about the beating on themselves than they are to say the more affluent, cleaner, more respectable person did wrong. Who are you going to believe? The soccer mom or the homeless wino?

We don’t mean to, but assumptions of character based on how people appear slip into all our judgments. Police are people too, and so although the try to be neutral… they, too, slip into assumptions. I am not siding against police. I am the granddaughter and niece of officers. I am saying police are human and humans make assumptions.

Assumptions are what the #blacklivesmatter movement is about. Assumptions are what feminism is about. Assumptions are what movements like these are trying to combat. The normal person assumes all people are treated equally and get the treatment they deserve… but that simply is not true.

In Isaiah, the servant is sent to trial and justice is perverted. Justice isn’t done. We founded out nation as a nation with liberty and justice for all — yet we have more people incarcerated than any other country. 2.5 million! .91% of our population. So 1 for every 110 people are in prison or jail at this moment. 1/31 on parole, 1/3 have a criminal record.

If you have criminal records, are on parole, or in prison or have been in prison… it is very, very hard to get employed. To have a life. Even if you change and don’t get in trouble with the law anymore… you are cast out of society.

A stupid decision at 18 means a life of poverty, hardship and a temptation to do worse crimes waits you for the rest of your life.

Mandatory sentencing for drugs means a single marijuana cigarette at 18 can lead to 70 years in prison. Who among us made smart choices at 18?! Why is that kid who made a single bad choice spending more time in prison than a man who chose to murder or rape another?

Justice is often perverted. Messed up. Not done. Even though we all try to do justice, and to uphold our laws, and write laws to bring about justice…

… too often, justice is not done.

Seed saving is one of my personal interests. You know — collecting some seed from this year’s crops and reusing it next year. Now you know if you sign an agreement with a seed company, like Monsanto or Syngenta, you’re not allowed to save seed and plant it the next year. The company owns the seeds as a patent. This makes sense to me. They designed the seeds. They own the seeds.

What doesn’t make sense to me is that they have a patent on the genes of the seeds and own wherever those genes go.

So take the case of 75 year old Vernon Bowman. He went to the grain elevator, bought some soy, and planted his field. He didn’t know some of the seed in the grain elevator was from RoundUp Ready crops. Crops whose seed was owned by Monsanto. So after he planted his field, he was sued. He was accused of purposefully robbing Monsanto, and the courts agreed. He’s the 410th farmer Monsanto has sued.

In some of these 410 cases justice was done. But not all of them. I think Bowman wasn’t intentionally stealing. But this elderly man now has a criminal record.

In Canada, the canola is a worst deal. A few years back a RoundUp Ready crop was planted on one side of the road by one farmer, and another planted a regular crop on the other side of the road. When Monsanto came out a few years later, they found their genes were in both crops. The farmer who didn’t sign a contract was sued. He was adamant that he never planted RoundUp Ready crops. But he saves his seed and replants some year after year. The courts decided that the two crops had cross pollinated over the years and although the seed-saving farmer had done nothing wrong at all… he was ordered to burn his crop.

He then was told to start with fresh seed and to leave an open fallow area between himself and the RoundUp Ready crops if he didn’t want cross pollination to happen again.

“Shouldn’t the RoundUp Ready crops leave a fallow space so they don’t contaminate the others?”

No.

That farmer lost crops, lost seed, and lost land.

The same pollination issues are happening in south America. Native corn crops are being burned because they have cross pollinated with GMO crops. The GMO seeds are five times more expensive than local corn. So poor people plant the local corn. But the local corn, like the corn in the grain elevator, is mixed with patented corn. Then the poor can’t afford a lawyer to defend their crops. And their crops get burned. And they are poorer than when they began. They starve if they plant seed and they starve if they don’t plant seed. And they starve because they cannot afford the GMO patent and cannot find corn that hasn’t been pollinated by GMOs.

These are the crazy kind of injustices that get me so angry. I know Monsanto, Syngenta, and other big names are doing great work and feeding more of us than ever was once possible — and I also know what kind of insane injustice is happening too.

Right now, the way our court system is set up, since genes themselves are patented and the company who owns the patent owns where the genes show up… it means a court someday may decide that our pigs who eat RoundUp ready crops belong to Monsanto. Or us — when we eat the pigs — get the genes in us and now we belong to the company. That’s ridiculous! But that’s how the law is being applied.

Neither me, nor, do I think, any of these seed companies, want this. They want their research protected. Local small farmers want to not starve. I want justice to be done. But sometimes all these desires get awful muddled when we get to court.

Justice, in courts, can get so perverted. So messed up.

I saw injustice in the courts most recently with a trial over children. Mom and dad divorced and shared custody of the kids. But mom wanted full custody. Dad said no, he wanted to share. The judge said, “Why are you trying to keep these children from their mother where they naturally belong?”

… Sexism in the court. It happens very frequently. Even if a mother is dangerous — has a drug habit, an unstable job, and many boyfriends — she is preferred over males to raise the children because the mother is where kids naturally belong.

Please — sometimes dad is the better parent!

Assumptions.

The judge assumed the woman had to be a good mother since she was a woman while the father wasn’t a good father since he was a man.

The judges assumed the farmers who saved seeds and replanted them were trying to steal from a company. Assumed the farmers were thieves.

Assumptions.

We all make them. God forgive us when our assumptions cause injustice and pain!

The suffering servant in Isaiah is assumed to be nothing, and he is dealt injustice, and he is murdered. People assumed Jesus was trying to start a rebellion against Rome, assumed he was speaking blasphemy when he said he was the Son of God, and he was murdered. People every day are assumed to be worthless, they are dealt with unjustly, and they get murdered.

Our jobs, as Christians, is to understand that injustice happens and will continue to happen until Christ comes again. It is our job to listen with ears that aren’t full of wax and dirt. Ears that are clean of past assumptions, clean of old hurts, clean to hear someone’s story anew.

Our job is to see Christ in the suffering servants of the world. To see someone who is poor and instead of thinking ‘what did they do to become poor’ think ‘there is Christ. Let me greet him.’

It’s our job to hear someone has done time in jail, or prison, and to treat that person as fully human. Fully worthy. Not a less-than. Not someone to bypass. You don’t know what they did. You don’t know how they’ve changed. You don’t know if they were there unjustly.

I am not arguing for you to assume everyone you meet is a saint. Oh no — there are bad people out there. Use your wisdom. I am arguing to be aware of your assumptions.

And when your assumptions lead you astray, be humble enough like the authors of Isaiah who wrote how wrong they had been. They wrote, “Who will believe us?” Who will believe the revelation that we have had ? Who will believe that the one we accounted as nothing is actually one of God’s great? Jesus told us again and again, and again in today’s reading, that those who are little… the servants, the people we overlook, the ones who the world ignores… are the ones God honors and calls great.

It isn’t human nature to NOT discriminate. It is godly nature. So we have to work at not discriminating, we have to practice.

Our Lord walks among us now. Will we greet him or tell him to beat it and get a job? Will we wash his feet and welcome him or tell him to get a hair cut and leave us alone? Will we greet him with palm fronds or handcuffs?

Our Lord walks among us. Is suffering injustices now. Will we walk with him or will we be the first to cast stones at him?

May we practice not discriminating. May we ask God for forgiveness when our assumptions hurt ourselves or others. May we always strive to be better disciples of Christ.

Amen.

Given to Saint Michael’s United Church of Christ, Baltimore, OH, 10-18-15