House Sparrows

1 Kings 8:1, 6, 10-11

Psalm 84

Great big monuments – monuments like the Statue of Liberty, like the Eiffel Tower, like Stonehenge and the Sydney Opera House- all share one big woe…

Birds.

Sparrows.

Like the little house sparrows who like to live in each and every little crevasse they can fit into within our own homes. I’ve got one family in a nest in a little nook between my chimney and my house; and another in between the beam and the siding of my shed. I can see a nest in the eaves of my neighbor’s porch, and I think there is one in each of the bird houses he’s put up all about his drive.

And still they want more nesting space. One keeps trying to turn a ledge against my window into a nest. There just isn’t enough of a ledge for her.

Today’s scripture is about the magnificence of the first temple. It is a sampling of pages of description. When it was wrote, the people were in exile and so wrote these remembering a fond building that was no longer around. It is a verbal tour of a remembered sacred spot. They wanted to record what an amazing building the temple was, and to keep its memory around.

The psalms about the temple, however, include humorous little insights about temple life. For instance — birds liked to nest in the temple eaves. Nations rise and fall, sacred buildings are built and destroyed – but sparrows continue to nest in eaves.

It doesn’t matter if that eave belongs to the first temple to God… or to a desolate ruin in a war-torn land… respectful or shameful, the birds nest there.

Although it is just a little insight, a small part of our reading, the lines about the sparrows nesting in the temple speak to me about God. Speak to me about who God is and God’s relationship to us.

Sometimes, I think I am a sparrow. In more ways than one.

For instance, some evenings I feel like I’ve felt the whole day flying here and there, to and fro. Like a sparrow, I’ve been busy all day but I don’t have anything to show for it. No stores of food gathered, nothing checked off my to do list, but yet I was busy all day it seems.

I know I landed on a few branches to take a breather just because it was so hectic!

But what did all this rush accomplish?

Other days, I feel like a sparrow seeking a dry spot from a storm. I huddle into this little eave but the wind buffets me here. I shoot over to that little branch and hope it is dryer, but it’s just as wet when I get there. I hide under a bush and cats startle me. I hide in places I thought were safe – like under a car – but it turns out they’re not. I go to people I thought were safe, friends or family – and it turns out they’re not. I’m weary to my bones and I feel like I’m dragging myself place to place but there is no rest.

Where is there safe shelter when it rains?

And some days, I am a sparrow below notice or care. The blue birds get special boxes made for them, the hummingbirds get special feeders made for them. I get chased out of my nests with brooms and angry curses. I get chased away from feeding on grain and feed by barn cats and yappy dogs. The green heron is protected and I am shot for sport. The cedar waxwing is photographed, the oriole praised for his song, and I am called a dull, drab nuisance bird.

Even the pigeon, called by some people a rat with wings, is said to sing prettily with those wings when it flies.

When everyone seems to get preferential treatment but me, I don’t feel special or wanted. Who cares about me? I’m not one in a million, but one OF a billion mes? As common as common can be.

Some days, we are sparrows. Pests. Getting into places we ought not. Rushing. To and fro without getting anything done. Common. Not flashy, not note-worthy, not on TV or YouTube. When we are sparrows – and we are sparrows more often than peaceful doves or proud cardinals I think – When we are sparrows, how does God feel about us? Where do we turn for comfort?

Usually we turn to the Bible for comfort. But it speaks of doves. Praises those rats with wings. It speaks of the dove of the Holy Spirit descending, the dove of peace with the olive branch in her mouth returning to Noah, the doves offered in the temple. But sparrows?

Because some days, I know I’m not a pure white dove. I’m a sparrow – common. I don’t stand out in the least. But I sing nevertheless. I raise my family. I sunbathe and splash in shallow pools. I gather thistle seed and millet. But this makes me common. A pest to some. A welcome song to others. And below the notice of most.

And yet, Jesus notices us.

The word for ‘sparrow,’ or a small bird, in the Bible is used by Jesus to represent the smallest of things. According to some scholars, sparrows were the meat of the poor. Hotdogs. Spam.

Jesus asks his disciples in Matthew, “Aren’t two sparrows sold for a penny?” and in Luke, “Aren’t five sparrows sold for two pennies?” So sparrows are a buy four get one deal! … we have buy one get one on hotdogs all the time. They’re not valuable. Other parts of the bible talk about snaring sparrows, and making them flee – catching and eating the little birds. But no one brags “I caught a sparrow for dinner!” Just like no one brags, “Come over for a Thanksgiving dinner of hotdogs!”

Cheap meat.

In Matthew Jesus continues, “Yet not one of these sparrows fall to the ground outside of your Father’s notice. Even the very hairs on your head are all numbered.” In Luke, Jesus continues, “Yet not one of these sparrows is forgotten by God. Indeed, even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do not be afraid, you are worth more than many sparrows.”

You are worth more than many hotdogs, and yet God even notices and cares for that cheap meat, too. God knows how many sparrows there are, and how many hairs are on your head. God knows. God notices. God cares.

Our Psalmist writes how in the temple are sparrows making their nests up in the porch, and in the eaves. The very least of meat, the very least of birds, the most common and not noteworthy are right there, with God. Living right under God’s protection, nesting in a place of honor.

No one and nothing is beneath the notice and care of God.

And the least are the most important to our loving parent.

The least – the ones who are without honor. The ones who keep messing up. The ones who need assistance to get by. The ones who need God’s forgiveness and mercy. God gives them love, welcomes them in, and provides for them the honor and security they don’t have in the normal world.

The normal world is cruel. The person who tries to do good is often burned, hurt, because they chose to follow their morals. The people who lie, cheat, steal, and speak badly about others seem to get ahead.

In the normal world, those who forgive are call weak. Those who do kind deeds are said to be self-righteous, or out to get something. Those who call themselves Christian and go to church are mocked in the public eye. Those who call themselves Christian and go to church and disagree with some of the things other Christians do and say are alienated, isolated, and told they are not true Christians for not being so radical. In the cruel normal world, no good deed goes unpunished… right? And the nice guy finishes last.

But we – we who know the temple of God – we who see the sparrows in the eaves – we know God envisions a new world. God is making, is speaking, is dreaming a new reality. In this to-come world, there is harmony. There is peace. There is justice. Even the lowly sparrow, the cheap meat, the pest, has a place and purpose. Has honor. Is wanted and welcomed. Even the lowly sinner, the one who keeps falling short, the one who society scorns has a place and a purpose. Has honor.

We, here today, are invited to live in this new world NOW. We who call ourselves Christians are standing with the sparrows and the outcasts. We are standing with one foot in the new world. We are dreaming with God and working with God to make the kindom – the land of mutual kinship – NOW. Heaven is not distant, the kingdom of God, the kindom of creation, is not far off in the future: it is now. And the more we live into it, the more we welcome it, the more visible and accessible it is to all people.

We have eternal life – we have life always new, always abundant – we have the promise of rebirth, of life after death and defeats – we have the promise of God’s abiding presence and love. There is no need to be afraid, to be silent, or to hang our heads in shame. Let us praise our God like a sparrow tweets over seed – let us praise God with sheer delight – for our God is love! And in this love, all have a place!

Given to Saint Michael’s United Church of Christ, Baltimore Ohio, 8-23-15

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